The New Colossus

World Premiere

Directed by Tim Robbins

Written by The Actors’ Gang ensemble and Tim Robbins

“[The Actor’s Gang] leans towards the cutting edge, both in stretching the boundaries of the theatrical form, and in content”

- LA Progressive

In The New Colossus, The Actors’ Gang members tell their ancestors’ stories, their struggles and their journeys from oppression to freedom. The New Colossus celebrates the courage and great character of the refugees who came to this country throughout the last 300 years. The ensemble of twelve reflects the great diversity that has defined who we are as a nation; The New Colossus is a celebration of our diversity.

Set somewhere between the 17th century and now, the play tells the story of forced migration and the constant struggle for survival and dignity in an uncertain and hostile environment.  The members of the acting company are from different parts of the world; they tell their stories, each in a different language, and each in different dress.

I live in Los Angeles, where one can only be struck by the contributions made to our city by immigrants and people who came here as refugees.  The Actors’ Gang felt compelled to respond to the government’s anti-refugee and anti-immigration policies – and to tell a story that draws attention to the true nature of people that live in this country.  Save for the Indigenous, all of our families came here as refugees or immigrants. The characters in the piece all seem different, from different parts of the world, traveling at different times – but the stories are remarkably the same: the common experience of all refugees is that they are fleeing some kind of oppression and moving toward safety and hopefully, freedom. Our hope is that we will be able to illuminate the courage, fortitude and humor of all refugees, and, perhaps, our own family.

– Director Tim Robbins 

The New Colossus shares a title with the sonnet written by poet Emma Lazarus in 1883 for an exhibit to raise funds for the pedestal for the Statue of Liberty, which opened in 1886. Even though the Statue of Liberty was not conceived as a symbol of immigration, Lazarus’ “The New Colossus” reinvented the statue’s purpose, turning Liberty into a welcoming mother, a symbol of hope to the outcasts and oppressed of the world.

February 8 – March 24

Our Cast:

TBD

Pay-What-You-Can

To make our work accesible to everyone in the community, every Thursday night is Pay-What-You-Can night. Just show up before 7:30 to get on the list.